iamdanw
Liptak’s story spotlighted a recent study by Zittrain and Albert which found that 50% of links in United States Supreme Court opinions were broken. As its name suggests, the Supreme Court is the highest federal court in the United States…it is the final interpreter of our Constitution. These opinions in turn document the decisions of the Supreme Court, and have increasingly referenced content on the Web for context, which becomes important later for interpretation. 50% of the URLs found in the opinions suffered from what the authors call reference rot. Reference rot includes situations of link rot (404 Not Found and other HTTP level errors), but it also includes when the URL appears to technically work, but the content that was cited is no longer available. The point was dramatically and humorously illustrated by the New York Times since someone had bought one of the lapsed domains and put up a message for Justice Alito
iamdanw

I was in China in 2007, at the first party-approved science fiction and fantasy convention in Chinese history. And at one point I took a top official aside and asked him Why? SF had been disapproved of for a long time. What had changed?

It’s simple, he told me. The Chinese were brilliant at making things if other people brought them the plans. But they did not innovate and they did not invent. They did not imagine. So they sent a delegation to the US, to Apple, to Microsoft, to Google, and they asked the people there who were inventing the future about themselves. And they found that all of them had read science fiction when they were boys or girls.

Neil Gaiman. Via wolvensnothere, linked elsewhere. (via wolvensnothere)
new-aesthetic
new-aesthetic:

"An Alaskan airport has closed an aircraft access route because of a flaw with Apple’s Maps app. Fairbanks International Airport told a local newspaper that in the past three weeks two motorists had driven along the taxiway and across one of its runways. Apple’s app directs users along the taxiway but does not specifically tell them to drive on to the runway."
BBC News - Apple Maps flaw results in drivers crossing airport runway, via Honor H, Liam Y.

new-aesthetic:

"An Alaskan airport has closed an aircraft access route because of a flaw with Apple’s Maps app. Fairbanks International Airport told a local newspaper that in the past three weeks two motorists had driven along the taxiway and across one of its runways. Apple’s app directs users along the taxiway but does not specifically tell them to drive on to the runway."

BBC News - Apple Maps flaw results in drivers crossing airport runway, via Honor H, Liam Y.